Systemic Racism and Disparities: Strategies for Accountability and Repair

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Multiple Dates

Systemic Racism and Disparities: Strategies for Accountability and Processes for Repair

A four part Webinar Series. Participants are invited to join us for all 4 sessions! 

Each session offers 1.0 CE for Psychologists and 1.0 CEU for Counselors, Social Workers and LMFTs. 

Can't attend the live sessions? All sessions will be available for viewing via recording and recieving CEs/CEUs 

This one-hour, four part series will address how systemic racism has contributed significantly to disparities in health and mental health for BIPOC communities. These historical inequities in mental health can also be seen in educational institutions.  Current and future education as well as treatment strategies committed to social justice, equity, diversity and inclusion will be provided.

The goals of this series are to:

a) more fully understand ways systemic racism has a direct impact on disparities in health and mental health for cultural and ethnic communities as well as BIPOC individually,

b) to recognize strategies clinically as well as educationally leading to greater equity, diversity and inclusion in clinical practice for mental wellness.

 


 

Session 1: Systemic Racism with Historical Inequities: Psychological Practice and Mental Health Treatment

Wednesday, January 12, 2022

12pm-1pm PST/2pm-3pm CT/3pm-4pm ET

Systemic racism continues to have negative impacts on ethnic and racial communities including BIPOC.  Physical as well as mental health experts point to adverse conditions contributing to negative life outcomes. In order to address mental wellness providers must understand the pandemic of racism as it contributes to historical inequities.  Such inequities are seen in justice systems, health, education, economic and social systems and more. The implications and ramifications for psychological practice and mental health care will be examined.  


 

Session 2: Systemic Racism with Historical Inequities: Psychology Education and Mental Health Treatment

Wednesday, February 9, 2022 

12pm-1pm PST/2pm-3pm CT/3pm-4pm ET

The pandemic of racism is evident in microaggressions, assaults, and an array of racial traumas. In addition to managing current stressors, intergenerational trauma also has an impact on mental wellness. The field of psychology, while wanting to contribute to an understanding of “normality”, has also sometimes played a role in viewing those as socially marginalized in negatives ways.  This can be seen in psychology education and subsequent mental health treatment. An examination of some of the impacts within psychological institutions will be presented along with initiatives to transform them.


 

Session 3: Structural Racism with Consequential Inequities: Clinical Implications and Ramifications

Wednesday, March 9, 2022

12pm-1pm PST/2pm-3pm CT/3pm-4pm ET

The deleterious impact of racism as well as other social ‘isms must be understood clinically. Adverse experiences, even those experienced in early childhood, may have consequences throughout the lifespan in multiple contexts.  An authentic therapeutic relationship means viewing clients fully including personal sources of survivance, strengths, recovery and resilience.  Following examples of cultural humility in practice there will be discussion among participants.  Generating an initial list of recommendations will conclude this session.


 

Session 4: Structural Racism with Sequential, Embedded Inequities: Clinical and Educational Commitments

Wednesday, April 13, 2022

12pm-1pm PST/2pm-3pm CT/3pm-4pm ET

In order to address structural racism and historical inequities, clients including those ethnic and racially diverse or BIPOC must be deeply understood. Cultural competence as well as cultural humility must be practiced along with ongoing education and accountability. The presenter will dynamically present these core practice concepts as well as models contributing to social justice, diversity, equity and inclusion with an emphasis on the self-of-the –therapist. Further generating a list of recommendations will conclude this brief four-part series.

 


 

Learning Objectives:

 

After attending this introductory level program participants will be able to:

1)     identify sources of systemic racism in current context

2)     describe ways in which racism is evident within social and service systems

3)     discuss ways in which racial traumas, past and present, contribute to stress and inequities

4)     examine ways in which psychology and mental health education has contributed to inequities and social injustices

5)     discuss ways in which psychological practices can contribute to greater equity, understanding and movements for social and relational justice

6)  summarize ways in which cultural competence as well as cultural humility, along with accountability of the practitioner can contribute to mental wellness

Program Standards and Goals:

 

This program meets APA’s continuing education Standard:1.3: Program content focuses on topics related to psychological practice, education, or reserach other than application of psychological assessment and/or intervention methods that are supported by contemporary scholarship grounded in established research procedures.

This program meets APA’s continuing education Goal 3: Program will allow psychologists to maintain, develop, and increase competencies in order to improve services to the public and enhance contributions to the profession 

 

References:

Lawrence, K., & Keleher, T. (2004). Chronic Disparity: Strong and Pervasive Evidence of Racial Inequalities. Retrieved 2020, from https://www.racialequitytools.org/resourcefiles/Definitions-of%20Racism.pdf[3]

Rutgers University. (2019, March 21). African-Americans more likely to be misdiagnosed with schizophrenia, study finds: The study suggests a bias in misdiagnosing blacks with major depression and schizophrenia. ScienceDaily. Retrieved June 23, 2020 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190321130300.htm[

Perzichilli, T. (2020, May 12). The historical roots of racial disparities in the mental health system. Counseling Today. Retrieved June 24, 2020, from https://ct.counseling.org/2020/05/the-historical-roots-of-racial-disparities-in-the-mental-health-system/[

Rutgers University. (2019, March 21). African-Americans more likely to be misdiagnosed with schizophrenia, study finds: The study suggests a bias in misdiagnosing blacks with major depression and schizophrenia. ScienceDaily. Retrieved June 23, 2020 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190321130300.html

American Psychiatric Association. Mental Health Disparities: Diverse Populations. (2017). Retrieved 2020, from https://www.psychiatry.org/psychiatrists/cultural-competency/education/mental-health-facts

Howard, C. (2018, April 12). The State of Minority Mental Health. Retrieved June 24, 2020, from https://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org/external/2018/04/state-minority-mental-health/

The Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research (BCTR). Psychology Today. (2019, August 27). How Racism Affects Youth Health and Well-being. Retrieved June 24, 2020, from https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/evidence-based-living/201908/how-racism-affects-youth-health-and-well-being

American Psychiatric Association. Mental Health Disparities: Diverse Populations. (2017). Retrieved 2020, from https://www.psychiatry.org/psychiatrists/cultural-competency/education/mental-health-facts

 

 


 

Registration and Fees

 

General Admission- All 4 sessions: $40.00

TCSPP Faculty ,Staff, and Students: Free*

TCS Affliate Facutly and Staff- All Four Sessions: $30.00

TCSPP Alumni, Site Supervisors, Community Partners: $30.00

Non-TCSPP Students**- No Certificate: Free

Non-TCSPP Students**-With CE/CEU Certificate, all 4 sessions: $20.00

 

Refund Policey: 100% of tuituion is refundable up to 48 hours before the program.

 

*Must register with a vaild TCSPP issued email address

 

**Must register with a valid student email address

 

 


 

 

CONTINUING EDUCATION:

  

Target Audience: Healthcare and Mental healthcare professionals, Students welcome

 

Psychologists. This program, when attended in its entirety, is available for 1.0 continuing education credits. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is committed to accessibility and non-discrimination in its continuing education activities. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is also committed to conducting all activities in conformity with the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles for Psychologists. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. If participants have special needs, we will attempt to accommodate them. Please address questions, concerns and any complaints to Danielle Bohrer at 312-467-2364. There is no commercial support for this program nor are there any relationships between the CE Sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants, or other funding that could reasonably be construed as conflicts of interest.

 

 

Counselors/Clinical Counselors. This program, when attended in its entirety, is available 1.0 hours of continuing education. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is licensed by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) to provide continuing education programming for counselors and clinical counselors.License Number: 197.000159

 

Social Workers. This program, when attended in its entirety, is available for 1.0 hours of continuing education. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is licensed by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) to provide continuing education programming for social workers. License Number: 159.001036

 

MFTs, LPCCs, and LCSWs. Course meets the qualifications for 1.0 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs, LPCCs, and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences. If you are licensed outside of California please check with your local licensing agency to to determine if they will accept these CEUs. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is approved by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS) to offer continuing education programming for MFTs, LPCCs, LEPs, and/or LCSWs. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is an accredited or approved postsecondary institution that meets the requirements set forth in Sections 4980.54(f)(1), 4989.34, 4996.22(d)(1), or 4999.76(d) of the Code.

 

Human Resource Professionals: This program offers 3.0 SHRM PDCs.The term “PDCs” refers to Professional Development Credits earned by Human Resource professionals. To offer PDCs for human resource professionals, programming must follow the criteria outlined by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM).

 

Participation Certificate. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is able to provide students and other participants who simply wish to have documentation of their attendance at the program a participation certificate.

 

Non Psychologists. Most licensing boards accept Continuing Education Credits sponsored by the American Psychological Association but non-psychologists are recommended to consult with their specific state-licensing board to ensure that APA-sponsored CE is acceptable.*Participants must attend 100% of the program in order to obtain a Certificate of Attendance. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

 

 

 

*Participants must attend 100% of the program in order to obtain a Certificate of Attendance.

 

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

 

Cancellation policy

Full refund provided for cancelation 48 hours prior to first session. After that time, no refund will be given.

Office of Continuing Education

Matthew R. Mock, Ph.D.
Professor of Counseling Psychology
John F. Kennedy School of Psychology, National University

Dr. Matthew R. Mock is Professor of Counseling Psychology with the College of Psychology at John F. Kennedy University (Pleasant Hill, Berkeley, and San Jose). He has had a longstanding private clinical and consulting practice with a specialty in diversity, cultural competence and social justice. Dr Mock received his Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology from Brown University and his Doctorate and Masters degrees in clinical and consulting psychology from the California School of Professional Psychology (CSPP). He served as the statewide Director of the Center for Multicultural Development with the California Institute for Mental Health in Sacramento, California. Just prior to this, he was Director of the Family, Youth, Children's and Multicultural Services for the City of Berkeley Mental Health Division where he was practicing for over 20 years. He was also Director and lead faculty of the Cross Cultural Program at JFKU focusing on diverse children and families. As an Adjunct Faculty with the California School of Professional Psychology, he focuses on the teaching of socio-cultural and psychotherapeutic considerations with Asian-Pacific Americans. He has published extensively in the areas of multiculturalism, diverse families, trauma, and social justice. Dr. Mock has worked with numerous universities and colleges extensively providing psychotherapy, consultation and training on multiculturalism, clinical interventions with Asian-American families and ethnic children, immigration, treatment of trauma, interracial relationships and biracial identity. He has given dynamic, invited presentations locally, nationally and internationally to community groups, universities, at conferences and on television and radio. .His workshops and trainings consistently received the highest ratings by participants. Dr. Mock is the recipient of numerous awards including the 1994 Cultural and Economic Diversity Award by the American Family Therapy Academy; the 2000 DMH Cultural Competence Leader Award (California); and 2011 CAMFT Distinguished Clinical Member Award. In 2019, he was the recipient of the Distinguished Contributions Award from the Asian American Psychological Association (AAPA). He is third generation Chinese American and highly committed to diversity, social justice, equity, cultural competence and community issues.

About Matthew R. Mock, Ph.D.

Professor of Counseling Psychology
John F. Kennedy School of Psychology, National University