Focus North Texas 2020

Friday, February 07 2020, 7:30 AM - 5:30 PM [CST]

500 West Las Colinas Boulevard, Irving, TX, 75039, United States

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Regular Registration Partial Approval - $150.00

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Available Tickets - 87 Sales end on - 02/03/2020

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Event Information

Friday, February 07 2020, 7:30 AM - 5:30 PM [CST]

About the Event

The North Central Texas and the Midwest Section

of the American Planning Association

Announce the

 

9TH ANNUAL 

 FOCUS NORTH TEXAS 

PLANNING SYMPOSIUM

 

 



THE 2019 EVENT SOLD OUT, SO GET YOUR TICKETS NOW! 

 

REGISTRATION - CLOSES FEBRUARY 3

$150

 


 

Opening plenary: Homelessness and alternative housing choices

 

 


 

 

Keynote Luncheon:

Retrofitting suburbia for 21st century challenges

Ellen Burnham-Jones

 

How are dead malls, dying office parks, and other aging auto-oriented properties being redeveloped, reinhabited, or regreened to help their communities address climate change, the loneliness epidemic, income inequality, and other pressing challenges they were never designed for? Following up on Dunham-Jones' and June Williamson's 2009 book, Retrofitting Suburbia and drawing on the over 2000 projects in her database, Dunham-Jones will present successful examples from her and Williamson's forthcoming book, The Retrofitting Suburbia Case Studies.

 

 


 

 Questions: Visit www.focusnorthtexas.com or contact Brooks Wilson.

Cancellation policy

No refunds will be granted within one week of the event.

Event Location

About the Organizer

The 2020 Focus North Texas Conference is brought to you by the North Central Texas (NCT) Section and the Midwest Section of the Texas Chapter in the American Planning Association. Both are non-profit professional organizations for urban planners in the Dallas-Fort Worth region. The American Planning Association (APA) is a nonprofit public interest and research organization committed to urban, suburban, regional, and rural planning. APA and its professional institute, the American Institute of Certified Planner (AICP), advance the art and science of planning to meet the needs of people and society.

CONTACT ORGANIZER

Event Speakers

Ann Bagley, FAICP
Independent Architecture & Planning Professional

Carol Barrett, FAICP
Pro Bono Planner

Lee Battle, AICP
Assistant Planning Director, City of Allen

Taylor Benjamin
Planning Technician, City of Arlington

Flora Alexandra Brewer, MPA
President, PF Residential LLC

Jacob Browning, AICP
Manager, Urban Planning, Downtown Dallas, Inc.

Dr. Lorin Carter PhD, Esq. E.I.
Founder & Chief Strategist, C-Suite Consulting

Nicole Chinea, CAPP
Senior Project Manager, WGI

Daniel Church, AICP
Service Area Planning Manager, City of Dallas Planning and Urban Design Department

Tamara Cook, AICP
Senior Program Manager, NCTCOG

Connie Cooper, FAICP
Cooper Consulting Company, Inc.

Dallas Cothram, PhD
CEO, Masterplan

Arturo Del Castillo, AIA, LEED AP
Chief Planner, City of Dallas Planning and Urban Design Department

Kelly Dillard, P.E., CFM
Managing Director, Walter P. Moore

Ellen Dunham-Jones
Author of Retrofitting Suburbia

Jennifer Dyke, CFM
Stormwater Program Manager, City of Fort Worth

Sahar Esfandyari, PhD Candidate
University of Texas at Arlington

Tracy Eubanks
CEO, Metrocrest Services

Katy Evans
City of Farmers Branch

Craig Farmer, FAICP
Municipal Planning Consultant

Lauren Fischer Ph.D.
Visiting Professor, University of North Texas

David Gattis, FAICP
City of Lake Dallas

Christina Glancy
Marketing Coordinator, RK&K

Qian He, PhD Student
University of Texas at Arlington

Christie Holland
nsit Planner, City of Alexandria

Dr. Myriam Igoufe
Vice President of Policy Development & Research, Dallas Housing Authority

Alexis Jackson, AICP
Director of Economic Development, City of Celina

Hyesun Jeong, PhD
Assistant Professor in Architecture, University of Texas at Arlington

Brian Keith, AICP, AIA
Director of Urban Design/Planning - Principal, JHP Architecture/Urban Design

Dr. Laura Keyes, AICP
Lecturer and Undergraduate Program Coordinator for Nonprofit Leadership, University of North Texas

Alan Klein
Director, University of Texas at Arlington Institute of Urban Studies

Michael Kovacs
City Manager, City of Fate

Amy Ladd
City of Fort Worth Police Department

Alan Lathrom, JD
Brown & Hoffmeister

Jason Laumer, PE
City Manager, City of Celina

Rick Leisner, AICP, ASLA
Principal, Norris Design

Travis Liska, AICP
Senior Transportation Planner, NCTCOG

Dusty McAfee, AICP
Director of Development Services, City of Celina

Doug McDonald, AICP
Planning Projects Manager, City of Richardson

David Magness
County Commissioner, Rockwall County

Angeles Margarida
Graduate Research Associate, University of Texas at Arlington Institute of Urban Studies

Kimberly Miller, AICP
Senior Resilience Planner, Halff Associates

Waffiyyah Murray
Better Bike Share Partnership Program Manager, City of Philadelphia

Eric Neagu, P.E., LEEP AP, AICP
Principal, Antero Group

David Nevarez, PE, PTOE
Senior Engineer - Traffic Engineering, City of Dallas

David Noguera
Director of Housing and Neighborhood Revitalization, City of Dallas

Renae Ollie
Assistant City Manager, City of Wylie

Shane Pace, AICP
Director of Community Development, City of Cleburne

Maggie Parker, MPA, MCRP
Innovan Neighborhoods, LLC

Maggie Parker, MPA, MCRP
Innovan Neighborhoods, LLC

Tara Perez
City of Fort Worth

Jason Pierce
Manager of Customer Contracts, Upper Trinity Regional Water District

Desiree Powell
Planning Technician, City of Lancaster

Jessica Shutt, PE
Mobility & Special Projects Manager, City of Richardson

Michael Schmitz
Senior Project Manager, Antero Group

Michael Schmitz
Senior Project Manager, Antero Group

Ryan Short
CEO, CivicBrand

Peter Smith, JD
Managing Partner, Nichols, Jackson, Dillard, Hagar & Smith, LLP

Kathleen Stanford
Graduate Research Associate, University of Texas at Arlington

David Tidwell
Transportation Planner, NCTCOG

Curtis Witek
Senior Planner, Antero Group

Event Schedule

  • February 7, 2020
07:30 AM
to
08:30 AM

Registration, Breakfast, and Networking

2nd Floor

$0.00

08:30 AM
to
10:00 AM
Track : Plenary or Keynote Session

Opening Plenary: Alternate Housing Choice and Homelessness

2nd Floor Ballroom

Discussion of homelessness, the societal cost of homelessness, and various alternative housing choices that might address this issue by a panel of experts in the field led by WFAA’s Kara Sewell.

Flora Alexandra Brewer, MPA

Dr. Myriam Igoufe

Dr. Laura Keyes, AICP

Maggie Parker, MPA, MCRP

(Moderator) Kara Sewell

10:15 AM
to
11:45 AM
Track : Homelessness/Alternative Housing

Brick by Brick: Reshaping Planning to Foster Affordable Housing

Meeting Room 3

Housing is a central component to creating livable and sustainable communities. The location, quality, and quantity of housing influences the overall health and well-being of individuals relative to ease of walkability and access, the quality of life of our vulnerable populations, and the ability to remain in the community as needs and resources change. This session explores these important issues in the context of housing affordability. Session participants will review how two pieces of legislation recently adopted by the Texas Legislature impact the affordability of housing in the DFW region. Participants will discuss opportunities for innovations to reduce displacement and inequities to support emerging livability efforts. Finally, participants will discover emerging trends in the provision of housing affordability though neighborhood revitalization.

Lee Battle, AICP

Lauren Fischer Ph.D.

Dr. Laura Keyes, AICP

Track : Transportation/Parking/Mobility

Parking for Walkable Places

Meeting Room 4

Dense, walkable city centers are on the rise in North Texas and so is the challenge of parking cars in these places without compromising their design and function. It is essential to create appropriate parking strategies for walkable places to be a success. Insights will be shared from case studies to illustrate that managing parking was key to place-making. Parking management topics such as minimum requirements in code, shared parking, parking pricing, data collection methods, and other strategies relevant to city code and housing policy will be covered.

Nicole Chinea, CAPP

Michael Kovacs

Travis Liska, AICP

David Nevarez, PE, PTOE

Track : Best Practices/Urban Design

Place-Making, Community Building & Urban Design

Meeting Room 5

This exciting and pertinent session will discuss Place-Making and Community-Building Planning Strategies, Design Approaches along with best practice Urban Design examples used to create these environments. The successful application of these approaches and principles will be reviewed through the presentation of numerous built projects.

Brian Keith, AICP, AIA

Rick Leisner, AICP, ASLA

Track : Parks/Environment

Open Space Planning: Case Studies

Meeting Room 7

How would your city go about prioritizing parcels of open space to preserve? How does a county set a strategic vision for open space preservation? Why is it important to plan for open space, just as we plan for housing, roads, and other infrastructure? What value does open space bring to our communities and North Texas? Through the lens of case studies from the City of Fort Worth, Rockwall County, and the Upper Trinity Regional Water District, these questions will be addressed and specific planning efforts of each entity will be shared. The goal of the session is to inform planners of the benefit and value of open space and provide examples of planning and implementation efforts underway to provide communities with a future plan for open space preservation.

Tamara Cook, AICP

Jennifer Dyke, CFM

David Magness

Jason Pierce

Track : Law or Ethics

Ethical Challenges Behind Closed Doors

Meeting Room 8

Applicants, supervisors, or clients may invite a planner to a meeting, close the door, and then ask you to do something helpful to them but which sounds illegal or unethical to you. How do you respond? You need a strategy both to conclude the meeting and to determine your long-range course of action. How do you proceed? Whom do you consult? How will the AICP Code of Ethics help you decide? Practical advice on how to proceed will be offered by planners with extensive experience working in Texas.

Carol Barrett, FAICP

Kimberly Miller, AICP

Renae Ollie

Track : Best Practices/Urban Design (Track 2)

Proactive Planning

Meeting Room 6

This session will focus on why it is crucial to promote proactive planning versus reactive planning. The planning process in Celina takes advantage of the growth headed north from Frisco and Plano. The session will give examples of how Celina is becoming a desirable place to live and work, based on a purposeful and strategic approach by the city leadership.

Alexis Jackson, AICP

Jason Laumer, PE

Dusty McAfee, AICP

Track : Elected & Appointed Officials

Planning 101

Meeting Room 9

As an elected or appointed official, your civic duty is to be aware of the issues and factors that influence each case that comes before the commission, council or board prior to its presentation. A basic understanding of zoning districts and the appropriate uses in each and a knowledge of the subdivision ordinance will make you a better leader in your community. The speakers will present a brief history of city planning and cover the key points necessary for the successful consideration of plans.

David Gattis, FAICP

11:45 AM
to
01:15 PM
Track : Plenary or Keynote Session

Keynote Luncheon: Retrofitting Suburbia - 2.0

2nd Floor Ballroom

How are dead malls, dying office parks, and other aging auto-oriented properties being redeveloped, reinhabited, or regreened to help their communities address climate change, the loneliness epidemic, income inequality, and other pressing challenges they were never designed for? Following up on Dunham-Jones’ and June Williamson’s 2009 book, Retrofitting Suburbia and drawing on the over 2000 projects in her database, Dunham-Jones will present successful examples from her and Williamson’s forthcoming book, The Retrofitting Suburbia Case Studies.

Ellen Dunham-Jones

01:15 PM
to
02:30 PM
Track : Homelessness/Alternative Housing

Addressing Homelessness

Meeting Room 3

On any single night, more than 6,000 North Texans are literally homeless. One-third of those were unsheltered and living in places not meant for human habitation. Chronically homelessness poses special problems for communities, consuming significant levels of resources for police, EMS, and code enforcement, depressing real estate values and quality of life in communities where they are concentrated. This session will provide a thorough review of the challenges in addressing homelessness. Attendees will learn the characteristics and origins of homelessness, issues surrounding equity and housing, the impact on communities, and strategies for developing supportive housing. Successful public-private partnerships that develop supportive housing will be discussed as well as strategies for mitigating the community impact of un-sheltered homelessness.

Flora Alexandra Brewer, MPA

Tara Perez

Amy Ladd

Track : Transportation/Parking/Mobility

Road Diet: Richardson Case Study

Meeting Room 4

The 1,200-acre industrial district surrounding the Arapaho Center DART Station has historically served as the building supply chain to Richardson’s Telecom Corridor. However, over the years this district has faced a number of challenges including vacancies, less desirable land uses, and aging infrastructure. In 2016, a study recommended rebranding the area into an Innovation District to encourage new incubators, accelerators, and small business development. One of the first implementation projects in this District was a road diet testing along a major six-lane thoroughfare. A grant from AARP’s Liveable Communities Initiative assisted the City with coordinating with the Better Block Foundation help the public to visualize the improvements. Attendees will hear from both a planner and engineer on the lessons learned throughout this testing phase and how they set the stage for a rezoning to ‘code the vision’ and align the regulatory framework with the post road-diet street types to further promote the City's new walkable, mixed-use transit-oriented vision.

Doug McDonald, AICP

Jessica Shutt, PE

Track : Best Practices/Urban Design

TOD & Placemaking: Arlington Case Study

Meeting Room 5

Streets are public spaces and conduits of movement for human activities. However, they are often an auto-oriented environment that lacks cultural diversity and human vitality. Within this Arlington case study, approximately 80% of commuting choice is in a single occupied auto. This street pattern tends to nullify public space and weakens the sense of community. Through the study of successful main streets in other cities, the speakers formed several proposals to enhance walkable urban corridors in Arlington. Planners will learn how to maximize cultural place-making Streets are public spaces and conduits of movement for human activities. However, they are often an auto-oriented environment that lacks cultural diversity and human vitality. Within this Arlington case study, approximately 80% of commuting choice is in a single occupied auto. This street pattern tends to nullify public space and weakens the sense of community. Through the study of successful main streets in other cities, the speakers formed several proposals to enhance walkable urban corridors in Arlington. Planners will learn how to maximize cultural place-making

Kathyrn Holliday, PhD

Hyesun Jeong, PhD

Track : Law or Ethics

Economic Development Tools & Decisions

Meeting Room 8

This session will focus on the legalities of economic development tools on development decisions including a discussion of how the building materials restrictions of Chapter 3000 of the Texas Government Code will affect planners and planning in the Metroplex.

Bill Dahlstrom, JD, FAICP

Peter Smith, JD

Track : Best Practices/Urban Design (Track 2)

Industrial Zoning - Balancing Your City's Assets

Meeting Room 7

Economic development in North Texas must include a mixed of uses, including industrial. As the population swells, many communities are failing to recognize opportunities for manufacturing, logistics, and other industrial uses that offer ample employment and tax base. This session will discuss economic development and land use approaches that allow for preservation of key industrial corridors in a manner that complements the booming residential market growth our region is experiencing.

Eric Neagu, P.E., LEEP AP, AICP

Michael Schmitz

Track : Best Practices/Urban Design (Track 2)

Forging Fulfillment Through Personal & Community Planning

Meeting Room 6

Are you an early planning professional trying to find your way? Or even a “seasoned” planning professional but feeling less inspired? This session focuses on cultivating personal values and passions into real-life planning concepts/projects that can help change the way we plan and how we maintain happiness and inspiration in our careers. Each speaker will present their challenges upon entering the planning profession along with their successes as they found their own paths to break out of the box of “traditional planning.”

Taylor Benjamin

Christie Holland

Desiree Powell

David Tidwell

Track : Elected & Appointed Officials

Ethics & Open Meeting Training

Meeting Room 9

Planning issues commonly involve a conflict of values and, often, there are large private interests at stake. These accentuate the necessity for the highest standards of fairness and honesty among all participants. Join city attorney Alan Lathrom for a session on the ethical and legal planning practices that elected & appointed officials face in their day-to-day careers. This training offers a thorough review of the standards of practice, ethics, and professional conduct involved in the planning process. This session also provides an overview of the Texas Open Meetings Act.

Alan Lathrom, JD

02:45 PM
to
04:00 PM
Track : Homelessness/Alternative Housing

Equitable Development & Inclusive Growth

Meeting Room 3

At a time when the DFW region is seeing exponential economic and population growth, it is also seeing a steady increase in the wealth gap between its poorest and richest citizens. Although steady and widespread, the new economic benefits have not been experienced equitably by all communities. The trending terms ‘equitable development’ and ‘inclusive growth’, in community and economic development, have been identified as effective tools to achieve this end. In this session we will help participants define these terms through an interactive discussion on how planning practitioners can embrace equitable development in their communities, be catalysts for inclusive growth, and effectively & thoughtfully balance varying community interests.

Dr. Lorin Carter PhD, Esq. E.I.

Maggie Parker, MPA, MCRP

Track : Transportation/Parking/Mobility

Mobility Toolkit: Getting to Work

Meeting Room 4

This session will focus on the economic benefit of mass transit, potential multimodal last-mile mobility solutions for riders, and the Mobility Toolkit that planners can apply to their own transportation issues. Using data from their A-Train case study, the speakers will discuss the fiscal impact of the A-train’s presence in the Metroplex. Working in North Texas and elsewhere, the Antero Group produced a toolkit that can be implemented in the Metroplex to identify transportation challenges and solutions. Planners will learn the methods for gathering and analyzing both spatial and non-spatial data and their economic impacts.

Michael Schmitz

Curtis Witek

Track : Best Practices/Urban Design

Battle of the Ages: Generational Changes

Meeting Room 5

Demographics show a bimodal distribution of Traditional Generation & Baby Boomers and their younger equally large cohort of Millennials. These generations are waging a fierce, if little understood, battle to define the state. Generational change is among the most understudied factors within the planning landscape. This conflict is often called the “Fourth Technological Revolution or Handheld Revolution.” This revolution, driven by Millennials, dates from 2007 and the rise of the iPhone and defines modern American, including planning and development. The retail world has experienced a seismic shift as a result of generational change and customer preference. The presentation will include first hand examples on a broad spectrum of development areas (student loans, voting patterns, restaurants and dining, marriage patterns, etc.). The presentation will be wide-ranging, amusing, and engage the audience in a meaningful way that creates discussion, disagreement, and collegiality.

Dallas Cothram, PhD

Track : Parks/Environment

Creating Parks from Leftover Spaces: Sonterra Case Study

Meeting Room 7

This session presents the case study of how the UT Arlington's Institute of Urban Studies and the residents of Sonterra, Texas worked together to develop a Master Parks Plan with the constraints of most available park land being floodplain, utility easements, or detention basins. Topics covered are geospatial analysis of park and facility coverage, understanding the limitations and potentials of available land, and building consensus among disparate interests.

Alan Klein

Angeles Margarida

Kathleen Stanford

Track : Law or Ethics

Texas Legislative Update

Meeting Room 8

Planners often find themselves at the mercy of the State Legislature when it comes to implementing local plans and administering regulations. Panelists will discuss the effects of recently passed legislation including limited places on local control, tax-related bills, attacks on home-rule authority, annexation, building materials, shot clocks, public hearings for residential replats, among others. Attendees will learn what local codes may have to be modified based on recent legislation enacted by the State.

Craig Farmer, FAICP

Allen Taylor, JD

Track : Best Practices/Urban Design (Track 2)

UNT Law Center - Renovating History

Meeting Room 6

The UNT Law Center recently took residence in the historic Dallas Municipal Court building. The speakers will discuss how the process of transforming a 100-year-old building into a LEED Gold center of higher education while maintaining its historic integrity had its challenges. These challenges were compounded by the multiple historic designations of the site and building. Discussion will focus on the design process, lessons learned, and the ongoing impact of the building.

Alison Beck-Maller, AIA, LEED AP BD+C

Amy Holzle, AIA, LEED AP BD+C

Gwen Morgan, RID, IIDA, LEED AP ID+C

Track : Elected & Appointed Officials

What Are Development Agreements & How Can Cities Use Them?

Meeting Room 9

This session will explain the use of development agreements between landowners and cities. What rights do these agreements afford? How do the standards spelled out in a development agreement affect zoning? Two leaders in city government will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these public/private partnerships.

John Lettellier, FAICP

Brooks Wilson, AICP

04:15 PM
to
05:30 PM
Track : Homelessness/Alternative Housing

Homelessness Intervention: Farmers Branch Case Study

Meeting Room 3

This session will describe the inception and development of the Safe & Sound Housing Empowerment Program and the impact it has had on the community. Its mission is to provide housing support to families with children in Farmers Branch who are homeless or on the verge of homelessness by providing direct housing support in parallel with self-sufficiency services such as financial capability, employment coaching, and education/training.

Tracy Eubanks

Katy Evans

Track : Transportation/Parking/Mobility

Retrofitting Transportation Networks

Meeting Room 4

Focusing on the three W’s, Transportation Experts with TJKM will demonstrate transportation trends that have been popular over the years, highlighting successes and pitfalls from projects throughout the Bay area. Who was the agency that implemented the strategy? What was the strategy? Why was it successful or not successful?

Colin Burgett

Aldo Fritz, AICP

Cory Peterson

Track : Best Practices/Urban Design

Collaborating for a Stonger Future in Dallas

Meeting Room 9

The 360 Plan is a comprehensive and strategic plan for Downtown Dallas that set forth a clear, cohesive vision for the downtown and its adjoining neighborhoods as “a place for everyone at the heart of the city.” Robust engagement shaped the vision and highlighted the need to focus on three key strategies: advancing urban mobility, building complete neighborhoods, and Place-making. This collaboration is helping Downtown Dallas achieve its vision of being a complete, connected, inclusive, robust, and unique City Center. The discussion will cover the planning efforts, implementation successes and struggles, and lessons learned along the way.

Jacob Browning, AICP

Daniel Church, AICP

Arturo Del Castillo, AIA, LEED AP

Track : Best Practices/Urban Design

Hood Politics: Engaging Marginalized Communities

Meeting Room 5

Planners will learn fundamentals for understanding, engaging, communicating, and planning with historically marginalized communities to ensure equitable and sustainable neighborhood improvements and improve cooperation among residents, planners, and city officials. The speakers will describe how trust was lost and can be rebuilt in many marginalized communities. Attendees will learn how to actively listen when conducting community research and develop the capacity to integrate knowledge to manage effective public engagement and involvement in these communities.

Christina Glancy

Christie Holland

Waffiyyah Murray

Track : Parks/Environment

The Role of Floodplains in Community Development

Meeting Room 7

A solid understanding of the risks and benefits of preserving and protecting floodplains can result in great natural amenities within a community. Natural channel management can lead to the creation of successful developments. This session will describe options for identifying, regulating, and protecting natural channels through local and federal floodplain regulations. Alternative options will be presented for easement dedications, riparian corridor protection, and finished floor requirements. Material will be based on training curriculum from FEMA's National Flood Insurance Program floodplain management course and actual development projects. Case studies will be presented where the floodplain was identified, protected and utilized as an amenity and resource for proposed community development within the City of Cleburne.

Kelly Dillard, P.E., CFM

Shane Pace, AICP

Track : Law or Ethics

2019 APA Ethics Case Study

Meeting Room 8

Participants will enjoy a lively discussion on Ethics – it is possible to enjoy ethics – using the AICP 2019 Ethics Case of the Year. The session will cover a series of ethical scenarios based on real-life planning issues. Ethics topics discussed include taking credit for work, withholding information, workplace harassment, disparaging comments, expert witness testimony, discrimination, political donations, and taking gifts.

Ann Bagley, FAICP

Connie Cooper, FAICP

Track : Best Practices/Urban Design (Track 2)

Building Safe Communities: the Impact of Environment on Crime

Meeting Room 6

Built environment factors are believed to play an essential role in shaping the geography of crime rates. Neighborhoods with a higher proportion of commercial land uses are thought to be more vulnerable to crime because commercial facilities attract outsiders to the neighborhood, thereby increasing its exposure to potential offenders. However, advocates of compact, mixed-use neighborhoods suggest that by combining commercial and residential uses can reduce crime by increasing opportunities for human surveillance, encouraging social interaction, and promoting a sense of community among neighborhood members. This study investigates the relationship between crime and the neighborhood built environment characteristics and how to create safer communities through policy changes.

Sahar Esfandyari, PhD Candidate

Qian He, PhD Student

05:30 PM
to
07:30 PM

Happy Hour at Yard House

Yard House, 320 W Las Colinas Blvd, Irving, TX 75039

$0.00

Informal post-event gathering and networking. Drink tickets and light-appetizers will be provided.